Aztec vs California Dancer

The Aztec Dancer is closely related to the California Dancer. The two species in Arizona are often found at the same locations and they behave similarly.

The Aztec and California Dancers often, but not always have a forked black humeral stripe. To differentiate the two species, examine the black marks on abdominal segment 2 (S2) and, in males in the hand, the tip of the abdomen. See pictures of each species for examples.

Arroyo vs Familiar vs Tule Bluets

Three of the small bluet species that occur in Arizona are the Arroyo, Familiar, and Tule Bluets. The Arroyo andFamiliar Bluets are widespread throughout the state and can be common or abundant. The Tule Bluet is found mostly in the eastern and northern parts of the state (Paulson 2009). The Arroyo Bluet is, on average, slightly smaller (average length: 30.5 mm) than the other two species (average length: 32.5 mm; Abbott 2005), but there is much overlap.

American vs Canyon Rubyspot

Two rubyspot species (Hetaerina sp.) are commonly found in appropriate habitats in Arizona: the American Rubyspot and the Canyon Rubyspot. The two species can be found at the same time and at a same location, but in Arizona only the American Rubyspot is normally present at low elevation sites. To separate mature MALESof the two species in the field, focus on the wing pattern, the abdomen color, and in the hand, the shape of appendages:

To separate mature FEMALES of the two species, focus on the wing pattern (as in males) and thorax color (see composite picture below):

Red-saddled Saddlebags (four species)

Four species of red-saddled Trameas have been recorded in Arizona: Red (common), Striped (uncommon), Sooty (vagrant), and Antillean Saddlebags (rare). Note that coloration in the Sooty Saddlebags changes with age: Mature individuals are completely dark whereas immature individuals are mostly red. This section, therefore, applies only to immature individuals of the species. 

Tonto Dancer, Argia tonto, at Seven Springs, Maricopa

The Tonto Dancer, Argia tonto, although widely distributed in Arizona, had until now never been recorded in Maricopa Co. On 20 June 2010 one male was found along the Seven Springs stream to provide a first county record.

Pages

Share
Subscribe to Arizona Dragonflies RSS